Florida Panther Facts - Florida Panther Mating & Family Life

The Florida Panther
Mating & Family Life

 

 

 

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The Florida Panther
Mating & Family Life


Breeding occurs at anytime of year but is most common between November and March. Once the female is no longer in heat (estrous lasts from eight to 11 days), the male leaves the area.

Gestation
lasts about three months, and the typical litter numbers one or two kittens. A newborn weighs only about a pound. Its eyes do not open for one or two weeks. Teeth begin appearing at about two weeks.

Although a young cat can eat meat after six weeks, the mother continues nursing it for about two months. She needs about two years to train a kitten fully in hunting skills.

Chaotic panther family life makes it difficult for any kitten to survive. Males do not assist in supplying food for the young and, as mentioned, have been known to kill and eat young cats.

Consequently, the mother must leave her kittens unprotected when she hunts, and she could be gone for two days or more. Male kittens will also be at risk anytime an adult male panther visits the mother for breeding.

When the female is ready to mate again, she leaves her offspring abruptly: she makes a kill for them and departs while they are still feeding. From that point, the youngsters are totally dependent on their own skills for survival.

With an estimated 160 Florida panthers left in the wild, what is your chance of ever spotting one? Perhaps the odds of winning a lottery might be better.

But you can view Florida panthers in a habitat that is as close as possible to the real thing. Follow the link below. You may find them a powerful, magnificent animal.

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